08 February 2009

RIAA moneygrab helpful for Creative Commons Music ?

According to this interesting article at ars technica, the RIAA seems to be going after what some would consider to be their best marketing arm. From the article:

The "Performance Rights Act" has been introduced in both the House and Senate with the goal of forcing US radio stations to start paying artists whose music is played on the air. Labels are pushing hard for the idea, but radio stations could hardly be more upset.
I sincerely hope that the fee for playing RIAA music will be very high, and the paperwork exceedingly onerous. Because that just might make radio stations take a longer and harder look at alternative suppliers for recorded music. Front and center for non profit radio might very well be Creative Commons (CC) licensed music, even more so than it already is. And for profit radio stations with low profit margins might start taking a hard look at such music next.

If this takes place, low cost and easy to administer music licensing hubs might become even more attractive than they already are for many other commercial users of music. And the CC Attribution license might become more attractive for artists to get their music onto commercial over-the-air radio.

While I have deep admiration for Prof. Lessig and his justified drive for meaningful copyright reform, I also often wonder, what would happen if we all just let the dinosaurs legislate themselves into oblivion.

Maybe a hint of things to come: CBC, the Canadian public broadcaster is frequently (increasingly?) using CC licensed music in their programs (and announce that fact clearly) not only in their web offerings and the progressive CBC 3 channel, but also on their primary CBC 1 radio channel, which has excellent reach across the country (and beyond).

2 comments - add your comment:

Dan-O said...

There is no doubt that the RIAA is making my job of giving away royalty free music in the creative commons incredibly easy.

Especially since YouTube was forced to disable thousands of videos, people are flocking to creative commons alternatives.

Dan-O
DanoSongs.com - Free Royalty Free Music"

refe said...

It would be great if radio stations turned to creative commons music to fill their play lists, but I'm not sure that's very realistic. Mainstream music isn't (at this point or at any point in the foreseeable future) royalty free. So if stations began playing more obscure music, would advertisers stick around?

Using CC music to avoid PRA fees wouldn't actually reduce costs, it would just keep them at their pre-PRA levels. They would still need the same amount of ad revenue as when they were broadcasting big name artists